Artificial photosythesis

Sustainable Energy A Big Leap for an Artificial Leaf A new system for making liquid fuel from sunlight, water, and air is a promising step for solar fuels. June 7, The bionic leaf is one step closer to reality. Daniel Nocera, a professor of energy science at Harvard who pioneered the use of artificial photosynthesis, says that he and his colleague Pamela Silver have devised a system that completes the process of making liquid fuel from sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water.

Artificial photosythesis

Over billions of years, they developed perhaps the most efficient power supply in the world: In the case of plants as well as algae and some bacteria"usable fuel" is carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

Humans, on the other hand, are looking for liquid fuel to power cars and electricity to run refrigerators. But that doesn't mean we can't look to photosynthesis to solve our dirty- expensive- dwindling-energy woes.

For years, scientists have been trying to come up with a way to use the same energy system that plants do but with an altered end output. Using nothing but sunlight as the energy input, plants perform massive energy conversions, turning 1, billion tons 1, billion metric tons of CO2 into organic matter, i.

And that's only using 3 percent of the sunlight that reaches Earth [source: The energy available in sunlight is an untapped resource we've only begun to really get a handle on.

Current photovoltaic-cell technology, typically a semiconductor-based system, is expensive, not terribly efficient, and only does instant conversions from sunlight to electricity -- the energy output isn't stored for a rainy day although that could be changing: See "Is there a way to get solar energy at night?

But an artificial photosynthesis system or a photoelectrochemical cell that mimics what happens in plants could potentially create an endless, relatively inexpensive supply of all the clean "gas" and electricity we need to power our lives -- and in a storable form, too. In this article, we'll look at artificial photosynthesis and see how far it's come.

We'll find out what the system has to be able to do, check out some current methods of achieving artificial photosynthesis and see why it's not as easy to design as some other energy-conversion systems. So, what does an artificial photosynthesis system have to be able to do?A look inside the labs at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis reveals the inventions and processes that yield groundbreaking discoveries in solar fuel.

The work was published in PNAS. Learn more about JCAP talks at conferences and meetings, publications, research highlights, and Databases. A key to the success of their artificial photosynthesis system is the separation of the demanding requirements for light-capture efficiency and catalytic activity that is made possible by the nanowire/bacteria hybrid technology.

Artificial photosynthesis is a chemical process that replicates the natural process of photosynthesis, a process that converts sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide into carbohydrates and oxygen; as an imitation of a natural process it is biomimetic.

A key to the success of their artificial photosynthesis system is the separation of the demanding requirements for light-capture efficiency and catalytic activity that is made possible by the nanowire/bacteria hybrid technology.

Berkeley Lab Researchers Perform Solar-powered Green Chemistry with Captured CO2. “We believe our system is a revolutionary leap forward in the field of artificial photosynthesis,” says Peidong Yang, a chemist with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and one of the leaders of this study.

Artificial Intelligence + Combinatorial Science = New Materials ACS Editor’s Choice® article describes the describes a new method for rapid construction of phase diagrams by combining AI with combinatorial X-ray data.

Artificial photosythesis
Artificial Photosynthesis Advance Hailed As Major Breakthrough | HuffPost